Directing energy with performance measures

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on google
Google+
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

Performance measurement and management wake mixed feelings in organizations. Disappointment, anxiety, and sometimes even fear. Still, we can’t escape the fact that various performance evaluations, management control, and a continuous need to run faster and aim higher are there to stay in our organizational life.


A million-dollar question then is, how could we, or the managers in modern organizations, implement such performance management practices that would encourage the type of behavior that supports performance improvement. Instead of those practices that deteriorate employee motivation, jeopardize the organizational culture, and ultimately, the success of the organization.


No matter what interventions or business activities you are measuring, there are few important things to keep in mind when developing and implementing performance metrics.

Focus on the essentials and be clear with your objectives.

If you don’t know what you are aiming for, don’t start with the metrics but get back to the strategy room. It is you, not anyone else, who should know what information is needed to evaluate whether you are doing well or not in whatever you do.

There is no lack of metrics cookbooks, performance management frameworks, or consultants, to assist you, but in the end, it is you who needs to choose what is important for and in your business. Keep your eye on the ball.

Encage those who matter the most.

Customers define the value of your products or services and employees make it all happen. Don’t even think that you have all the wisdom needed for developing a perfect performance management system on your own. If you didn’t notice, the time for that went by already.

Today, co-creation, co-production, and participation are not only timely management buzzwords but something that you really need to consider also in performance management. Academics talk about integrative leadership and performance dialogue to make a distinction between the ‘old’ management control and what could be called ‘modern’ performance management.

Of course, the real world isn’t always black and white. Remember that your metrics will always reveal what is valuable to you. Walk the talk.

The data do not suffice.


Data is where it all begins. Use the force to direct the energy of your employees. Evaluate, control, budget, motivate, promote, celebrate, learn, and improve. It makes no sense to waste your money and energy in measuring if that is the end.

Be eager to learn and open-minded when having new data. Challenge yourself and the people involved. Shake it and share it. Ask as many why’s needed to find the root cause. The explanation, the reason why you either failed or succeeded. That is where the value of performance measurement lies.

And, followed from the second point, make benefit of multiple opinions and performance dialogue also when interpreting the data. Let them all help you.


One of the main messages in what I have written above is that you really need to know and understand the business and the context when developing performance metrics. The better you understand how the managers, or other users of performance information, think and what they do and expect, the better you can serve their information needs.

Many indicators or KPI’s and even readymade measurement frameworks are applicable across industries. However, it may well be that the most appropriate ones to measure and evaluate your business are not among those solutions already available. If you think that you found the answer from the market, it may well be that you are playing according to someone else’s playbook.


Common indicators enable comparison but may lead to competition on efficiency. Proving the value of unique and innovative strategies may require unique and innovative performance information. It is not the simplest way to approach performance measurement but may provide valuable opportunities for learning and improvement.

Always be sure that your measures direct the energy where you want!

Harri Laihonen,

Professor, University of Eastern Finland

More to explorer

Transparent Measuring Improves Performance

Logical measurement is a systematic process by which an organisation continuously and consistently tracks and applies important project and operations data for

A leader in the market

Every Meter Included in our reports

IMPACTS

COST AND INCOME CALCULATOR

This is a tool for calculating costs (pre, on and post event phases) and incomes of meetings, incentives, conferences and events.

 

SALES ACTIVITIES AND RESULTS 

These are meant to prove the influence and success of the event for sales activities among current, returning and new customers & growth of sales and market share. Metrics serve also to track the number and value of leads, offer requests, generated offers and deals.

 

DEVELOPMENT OF SALES & PRODUCTION PROCESSES 

These meters are meant to prove the development of processes related to sales and production/manufacturing.

 

ECONOMIC IMPACTS

These meters are meant to prove the economic impact of the event. Includes also Event ROI and Benefit-Cost Ratio metrics.

 

LEARNING INDICATORS

These meters are meant for the evaluation of success and impact of learning. The purpose is to measure in which extent reality has met the expectations.

 

BRAND EXPERIENCE AND IMAGE SUCCESS INDICATORS

These meters are meant for the evaluation of success of expressing the Brand Experience and image. The purpose is to measure in which extent reality has met the expectations.

 

RESPONSIBILITY RATES

These meters are meant for the evaluation of responsibility and sustainability of the event in an ecological, economic and socio-cultural context. The purpose is to evaluate in which extent the execution has met the set targets.

PERFORMANCES

EVENT ORGANISER / AGENCY EVALUATION

These meters are meant to evaluate the internal event organiser or event agency. The purpose is to measure in which extent performance has met the expectations.

 

PERSONNEL ACTIVITY AND PERFORMANCE RATES

These meters are meant for the evaluation of operational activity on pre, on and post-event phases. The purpose is to measure in which extent expectations have met the performance.

 

EVENT ELEMENTS SUCCESS INDEXES

These meters are meant for the evaluation of the success and workability of the event elements, in the context of substance, feeling factors and physical elements. The purpose is to measure in which extent reality has met the expectations.

 

NETWORKING SUCCESS AND EFFICIENCY INDEXES

These meters are meant for the evaluation of success and efficiency of networking on pre, on and post-event phases. The purpose is to measure in which extent reality has met the expectations.

PROCESSES

COMMUNICATION AND MARKETING PROCESS INDEXES

These meters are meant to evaluate the success of the event communication and marketing processes. The purpose is to measure in which extent reality has met expectations on pre, on and post event phases.

 

INVITATION PROCESS SUCCESS RATES

These meters are meant to prove the results and efficiency of the invitation process.  The Invitation Process Success Rates is divided into 3 metrics: Participant, No-Show and Invitation process efficiency Rates.

 

PRE- AND POST-EVENT ACTIVITY INDICATORS

These meters are meant to evaluate the success and efficiency of processes relating to planning, production and post-event phases. The purpose is to measure in which extent reality has met the expectations.